BPA Dental Sealants

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Dentists Want More Research on Bisphenol-A

With news that bisphenol-A may be linked to health problems have left dentists somewhat concerned about the chemical’s presence in dental sealants and composite.

June 9, 2008 (San Francisco, California) Dentists are worried about the safety of dental sealants and composite, reveals a recent survey by dental management resource The Wealthy Dentist. The majority of dentists are worried about their bisphenol-A content and are hungry for additional research on the subject.

Bisphenol-A is a chemical monomer that's used to manufacture certain plastics. BPA, as it's known, has recently dominated headlines as a potentially serious health threat.

Research suggests that cells may respond to this synthetic chemical as if it were the female hormone estrogen. Authorities do not always agree in their analysis of the results of animal studies. Some of these seem to show distinct feminizing effects, while others suggest that low levels of BPA produce no measurable changes.

It is known that the majority of Americans do have detectable levels of BPA in their blood. However, it's not known if these levels are high enough to cause health effects.

BPA exposure can come from any one of a number of avenues: drinking from a plastic water bottle, for example, or microwaving food in a plastic container. Baby bottles are of particular concern, especially as BPA's hormone-like effects could potentially have far more serious effects on infants and children than adults.

Bisphenol-A is also a component of many dental sealants and composites. (Dental composite is the tooth-colored material that cosmetic dentists use to fill cavities.) Some dentists are genuinely worried about the health consequ8ences of BPA in dental products, while others scoff at the suggestion.

“I am concerned about this because of all the composites and sealants being used in children,” said one Texas dentist. “It needs immediate research,” declared a Mississippi dentist. “We need to know what amounts are harmful and if it is accumulative," agreed a California dentist.

“It’s a concern, but I’m sure there is more stuff in plastic that’s bad for us, also," offered a  dental office worker. “It's probably not too dangerous, but don’t cast stones, Mr. Composite: you live in a glass house!” said a New Jersey dentist.

“This stuff is everywhere. Composites without BPA just don’t hold up well,” offered a Wisconsin dentist. “The quantities are probably miniscule,” argued an Illinois dentist.

There is a long-running battle in dentistry between composite (tooth-colored) and amalgam (metal) fillings. Amalgam fillings are cheaper, but composite fillings look better. Amalgam contains mercury, but composite contains BPA. “It’s ironic that many patients are removing long-tested amalgam fillings and replacing them with bisphenol composites of unproven safety,” sighed a California dentist.

"I'd like to be doing all gold restorations," said a New Jersey dentist.

"Honestly, is there anything left that's non-toxic?" asked Jim Du Molin, internet dental marketing guru and founder of dental website The Wealthy Dentist. "With so many potential health threats around today, it's a challenge to decide which ones you're going to bother to worry about!"

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